Step 1: Assessment

Step 1: Assessment

Helpful tools

Resources

  • Community Readiness Assessment Information and Materials, Agnew::Beck, adapted from Tri-Ethnic Center Information and tools to help with implementing acommunity readiness assessment, including an overview of the Tri-Ethnic model; a set of baseline questions that communities can adapt; portions of “mock interviews” from a service provider, clergy member, and community member at large, for use in going through a practice scoring exercise; detailed scoring sheets by domain; a summary scoring sheet; and a tool for brainstorming strengths, concerns, and resources in a group setting.
  • Consumption and Consequence, State of Alaska 2012 Epidemiologic Profile on Substance Abuse
    Report from the Alaska Substance Abuse Epidemiological Workgroup, including discussions and data regarding consumption, consequences and influences. (Note: The influences section is still under development and will be included with the final report.)
  • Sample Logic Model, Coop Consulting and Kamama Consulting
  • Consumption and Consequence, State of Alaska 2013 Epidemiologic Profile on Substance Abuse
    Completed logic model from New Mexico SPF SIG process, including consumption, consequences, intervening variables, and strategies
  • Community Readiness Handbook,Tri-Ethnic Center for Prevention Research
    A detailed guide to conducting the Tri-Ethnic Center’s Community Readiness Assessment Model, which includes nine levels of community readiness in six distinct domains including awareness and knowledge, community climate, leadership, efforts and resources.
  • Grantee Training Presentation: Assessment Focus, Kamama Consulting, October 2011
    Slide presentation from October 2011 grantee training in Anchorage, led by Paula Feathers of Kamama Consulting
  • October Web Training: recordings + resources, Agnew::Beck
    Audio recordings with links to accompanying documents used in the October 2011 grantee training
  • Uniform Crime Code, State of Alaska Department of Public Safety
    Annual report on reported crimes in Alaska.
  • Alaska Victimization Survey, UAA Justice Center.
    A 2010 survey conducted to provide reliable and valid estimates of intimate partner violence and sexual violence.
  • Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS), Alaska DHSS Division of Public Health; Women’s, Children’s and Family Health.
    The PRAMS is an ongoing survey of mothers of newborns that collects state-specific, population-based data on maternal attitudes and experiences before, during, and after pregnancy.
  • Childhood Understanding Bevaviors Survey (CUBS), Alaska DHSS Division of Public Health; Women’s, Children’s and Family Health.
    Alaska CUBS is a program designed to find out more about the health and early childhood experiences of Alaska toddlers. Alaska-resident mothers who completed the PRAMS survey after their infant was born are sent a CUBS survey when their child is 3 years old. CUBS asks questions about both the mother and her toddler.
  • Economic Cost of Alcohol and Drug Abuse, Alaska Mental Health Board & Advisory Board on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse, Alcohol and drug abuse impacts Alaska’s economy in a variety of ways. It can lead to greater health risks and death, impaired physical and mental abilities, crime, greater reliance on public assistance, and a number of other adverse effects. This study addresses tangible economic costs such as lost earnings or costs of government programs.
  • CASA Teen Survey, The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, This 17th annual “back-to-school survey” continues the efforts of The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University to track attitudes of teens and those, like parents, who influence them. For more than a decade and a half this survey has sought to identify characteristics, situations and circumstances that increase or decrease the likelihood of teen substance abuse.